Saturday, October 21, 2017

Perspective.


John Pavlovitz:

To see all that you’ve seen and to still contend that this President has the slightest bit of compassion or decency or competency, points either to a complete lack of sense, of awareness, or of character—all of which make fellowship with real barrier-shattering diversity a tall order. Reiterating this President’s platform and his conduct or declaring it reasonable or normal, in nearly every way takes a chainsaw to the bigger table.

Donald Trump’s steadfast base (composed mainly of white Christians) have never not been welcomed at the table, and that’s why this all will be difficult for them. In order for his proponents to meet people in relationship while upholding those fundamental non-negotiables that affirm the intrinsic worth of disparate humanity—they really have to stand in direct opposition to him. It’s virtually impossible to simultaneously claim alignment with this President—and with a table where equality, diversity, and empathy all get seats.

Friday, October 20, 2017

The late congresswoman Bella Abzug used to say, "Working women wore hats. It was the only way they would take you seriously." The men? Who the hell knows what they're aiming for?

This woman is a member of Congress from Florida. She likes to wear hats.



The President of the United States and his chief of staff have been attacking her. The *resident says Congresswoman Frederica Wilson is "wacky."

This man is the former sheriff for Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He likes playing dress-up uniforms to rival the members of the North Korean high command:



 Ex-sheriff Clarke also likes to wear hats:



















David Clarke has reportedly been considered for high-level posts in the *resident's administration. MOTUS has never called him "wacky."

This one is the Republican nominee for US Senator from Alabama:



And this is the leader of the free world (attended by Secretary Tillerson):




What Fresh Hell? for October 20, 2017: Nice Nazis, patriotic Fox News frauds, and soccer's as corrupt as ever.



Here’s a bracing example #AltRightIrrationality. Kelli Ward, in her third consecutive year of running for the US Senate in Arizona, is hoovering up money from all over America to unseat Senator Jeff Flake. Breitbart’s Steve Bannon, who thinks Ward is a perfect fit in his Roy Moore Corps of bigots, non-residents, and felons, is all in for her. More conservative-than-crazy conservatives have made Flake Enemy #1.

Yet Ward argues, out of both sides of her mouth, that Senator Flake is both the biggest threat to truly flaky government and a frail, hapless political valetudinarian:

“Since Donald Trump has been in the White House, Jeff Flake has been one of his biggest antagonists,” Ward said in a telephone interview on Wednesday. “Those attacks are unfortunate. And that’s why he’s so weak.”

*****


Former Fifa president Sepp Blatter has accepted an invitation from Russian leader Vladimir Putin to attend next year's World Cup.

Blatter's 17-year spell in charge of world football's governing body ended amid a corruption scandal in 2015.

Fifa subsequently banned Blatter from the sport for eight years, a term later reduced to six years after appeal.

"I will go to the World Cup in Russia," said Blatter, 81. "I received an invitation from President Putin."

*****

“Very nice person” Spencer at Charlottesville

$600,000 in university security costs and a state declaration of emergency later, American Nazi Richard Spencer has strewn hatred on the campus of a Florida university. What to make of the experience? An ethics prof notes:

Are Spencer and those who protest him not only legally but also morally equivalent, as Ted Yoho, our congressional representative, implies? Yoho describes all those who oppose Spencer as “Antifa, a so-called ‘anti-fascist’ group comprised of radical Marxists and anarchists.” He sees no possibility that people who are not “radicals” would reject white supremacy. By denying substantive differences in the values of white supremacists and those who protest them, this approach avoids meaningful moral reflection and, in this case, reinforces Spencer’s frequent claim that he is a victim of people who want to “stifle” his free speech.

Another kind of moral equivalence is suggested by protesters who accuse those who stay away from campus, in a deliberate effort to deny Spencer more publicity, of acting like “good Germans,” a phrase that was used regularly in discussions prior to Spencer’s visit. Do those who ignore tacitly enable white supremacists to gain power? Do those who protest strengthen Spencer by following his playbook of confrontation? There is no easy answer to this question, and no theoretical one. The only sure answer will be the practical one – what happened? And that we will have only in retrospect.

*****


The statement continued: “[E]very lawyer knows that if they name Tesla as a defendant in their lawsuit, it maximizes the chances of generating publicity for their case. They abuse our name, because they know it is catnip for journalists … There is no company on Earth with a better track record than Tesla, as they would have to have fewer than zero cases where an independent judge or jury has found a genuine case of discrimination.”

Corporations such as Tesla, however, often have employees sign arbitration agreements, which means employees are forced to privately resolve their discrimination complaints. The spokesman declined to say if Tesla has ever allowed a discrimination claim to go before a judge or jury.

*****




Navy veteran John Garofalo appeared on a Fox News segment this month, showing off a massive presidential seal he carved for President Trump while receiving praise for his service in Vietnam as a SEAL.

The piece was broadcast nationally and featured cascading shots of all Garofalo’s medals. Online, it went viral, racking up 1.5 million Facebook views on Fox’s Facebook page.

“The Vietnam War veteran served seven years as a member of the nation’s first Navy SEAL team,” Fox News reporter Bryan Llenas said. “He was awarded 22 commendations, including two Purple Hearts.”

Llenas later called the 72-year-old New York State resident a “tough, tough man.”

“He was listed twice during his service in Vietnam as missing in action,” Llenas noted at the segment’s close.

“God bless John Garofalo,” an anchor said. “We certainly hope maybe the president is listening.”

But when Navy Times contacted Garofalo Thursday, Garofalo admitted he had lied and never served in Vietnam, never received a Purple Heart and was never a SEAL.

Garofalo said he had falsely portrayed himself as a Vietnam vet and a SEAL for years.

*****

Conservative economist Tyler Cowen reviews a new book on the fall of the Roman empire. Shockingly, gays played no part at all.


*****

The *resident’s secretary of press says war widows probably just misunderstand the warmth and empathy of his caring words. As MOTUS himself told America in 2015,

I know words, I have the best words. I have the best, but there is no better word than stupid.

And he told us a year later,

I’m speaking with myself [rather than foreign policy advisers], number one, because I have a very good brain and I’ve said a lot of things.

Perspective.


Seth Godin's Blog:

What will you do with your surplus?

If you have a safe place to sleep, reasonable health and food in the fridge, you're probably living with surplus. You have enough breathing room to devote an hour to watching TV, or having an argument you don't need to have, or simply messing around online. You have time and leverage and technology and trust.

For many people, this surplus is bigger than any human on Earth could have imagined just a hundred years ago.

What will you spend it on?

If you're not drowning, you're a lifeguard.

Duty. Honor. Country. Politics. As Fox News says, "General Kelly defends Trump, shuts down libs' politicization of a tragedy"



In The White House Chief of Staff's comments yesterday, below the fold was a disturbing, full-throated endorsement of #MAGAism and a backhand to the freedom of the press.

First, the General harkened back to when racism flourished, women were second-class citizens whose bodies were controlled by men, and gay Americans could be jailed for just being gay Americans:
You know, when I was a kid growing up, a lot of things were sacred in our country. Women were sacred, looked upon with great honor. That's obviously not the case anymore as we see from recent cases. Life -- the dignity of life -- is sacred. That's gone. Religion, that seems to be gone as well. 
Gold Star families, I think that left in the convention over the summer. But I just thought -- the selfless devotion that brings a man or woman to die on the battlefield, I just thought that that might be sacred.
Having invoked his remembrances of Father Knows Best (kudos, though, for his sotto voce diss of the GOP's slander of the Khan family last year), Kelly- who is 67- wrapped himself in the flag to gag most of the White House press corps:
So I'm willing to take a question or two on this topic. Let me ask you this: Is anyone here a Gold Star parent or sibling? Does anyone here know a Gold Star parent or sibling? 
...Any other -- someone who knows a Gold Star fallen person. 
John? 
...I'll take one more, but it's got to be from someone who knows -- all right.
General Kelly is often cited as "one of the adults in the room" around the *resident and is rightly renowned for his probity and dedication to duty.

Part of duty is a dedication to the principle of civilian control of the military, and General Kelly showed, yesterday, just how far he is willing to go to uphold the principle, in principle. This morning on NPR, National Review's snarky frontman Jonah Goldberg summoned television memories (he was born five years after the general died) to draw a vague visual comparison between Kelly and General Douglas MacArthur-






-as a touchstone, praising him for his "gravitas, also this sort of amazing Douglas MacArthur-esque, ah, persona for a bygone era, nostalgic for, ah, an America that was, that sort of Jimmy Cooper, you know, spartan stoic reserve..."

General Kelly gave two speeches at once yesterday. One was a valuable, needful, explanation of the military's protocols for recovering and seeing home its dead. He then put a face on the tragedy of war: his own. To the horrific news that a parent has lost a child to war, one can only imagine the added anguish when both are soldiers.

The other speech, however, was another loyalty oath re-up with his boss.

Kelly- who in his months as Homeland Security Secretary was all in with the *resident's ramped-up deportation roundups, the export of American citizens, and the first two travel bans- proved himself an adept at the long-form version of presidential tweets:
I was stunned when I came to work yesterday morning, and broken-hearted at what I saw a member of Congress doing. A member of Congress who listened in on a phone call from the President of the United States to a young wife, and in his way tried to express that opinion -- that he's a brave man, a fallen hero, he knew what he was getting himself into because he enlisted. There's no reason to enlist; he enlisted. And he was where he wanted to be, exactly where he wanted to be, with exactly the people he wanted to be with when his life was taken. 
That was the message. That was the message that was transmitted. 
It stuns me that a member of Congress would have listened in on that conversation. 
Absolutely stuns me. And I thought at least that was sacred.  
...And when I listened to this woman and what she was saying, and what she was doing on TV, the only thing I could do to collect my thoughts was to go and walk among the finest men and women on this Earth. And you can always find them because they're in Arlington National Cemetery. I went over there for an hour-and-a-half, walked among the stones, some of whom I put there because they were doing what I told them to do when they were killed. 
...I'll end with this: In October -- April, rather, of 2015, I was still on active duty, and I went to the dedication of the new FBI field office in Miami. And it was dedicated to two men who were killed in a firefight in Miami against drug traffickers in 1986 -- a guy by the name of Grogan and Duke. Grogan almost retired, 53 years old; Duke, I think less than a year on the job. Anyways, they got in a gunfight and they were killed. Three other FBI agents were there, were wounded, and now retired. So we go down -- Jim Comey gave an absolutely brilliant memorial speech to those fallen men and to all of the men and women of the FBI who serve our country so well, and law enforcement so well. 
There were family members there. Some of the children that were there were three or four years old when their dads were killed on that street in Miami-Dade. Three of the men that survived the fight were there, and gave a rendition of how brave those men were and how they gave their lives. 
And a congresswoman stood up, and in the long tradition of empty barrels making the most noise, stood up there and all of that and talked about how she was instrumental in getting the funding for that building, and how she took care of her constituents because she got the money, and she just called up President Obama, and on that phone call he gave the money -- the $20 million -- to build the building. And she sat down, and we were stunned. Stunned that she had done it. Even for someone that is that empty a barrel, we were stunned. 
But, you know, none of us went to the press and criticized. None of us stood up and were appalled. We just said, okay, fine.
Having earned the *resident's approval by attacking a member of Congress for telling what a war widow-and friend- allowed her to hear (What was she supposed to do, put her fingers in her ears?)- not to mention keeping a straight face over the fact he and a roomful of aides were listening in at the *resident's end-  Kelly went on, Tillerson-like, to not deny what the *resident- and the member of Congress- said:

When I took this job and talked to President Trump about how to do it, my first recommendation was he not do it because it’s not the phone call that parents, family members are looking forward to. It’s nice to do, in my opinion, in any event.

He asked me about previous Presidents, and I said, I can tell you that President Obama, who was my Commander-in-Chief when I was on active duty, did not call my family. That was not a criticism. That was just to simply say, I don’t believe President Obama called. That’s not a negative thing. I don’t believe President Bush called in all cases. I don’t believe any President, particularly when the casualty rates are very, very high — that Presidents call. But I believe they all write.

So when I gave that explanation to our President three days ago, he elected to make phone calls in the cases of four young men who we lost in Niger at the earlier part of this month. But then he said, how do you make these calls? If you’re not in the family, if you’ve never worn the uniform, if you’ve never been in combat, you can’t even imagine how to make that call.


Nor did General Kelly deny that the *resident uttered the tone-deaf condolences the *resident has denied:

So he called four people the other day and expressed his condolences in the best way that he could. And he said to me, what do I say? I said to him, sir, there’s nothing you can do to lighten the burden on these families.

Well, let me tell you what I told him. Let me tell you what my best friend, Joe Dunford, told me — because he was my casualty officer. He said, Kel, he was doing exactly what he wanted to do when he was killed. He knew what he was getting into by joining that 1 percent. He knew what the possibilities were because we’re at war. And when he died, in the four cases we’re talking about, Niger, and my son’s case in Afghanistan — when he died, he was surrounded by the best men on this Earth: his friends.

That’s what the President tried to say to four families the other day.


Had he stuck to what General Kelly told him, MOTUS would have done better. But he always knows better, and he lacks the grace to ever, ever admit he might have done anything better. He is, after all, a man who has never asked God to forgive him for a single thing in 71 depraved years:
"I am not sure I have. I just go on and try to do a better job from there. I don't think so," he said. "I think if I do something wrong, I think, I just try and make it right. I don't bring God into that picture. I don't.
Charlie Pierce reviews the terms of the general’s contract with the devil:

This strikes me as a terribly sad moment. Everything and everybody this president* touches goes bad from the inside out. And it doesn’t matter to me whether people volunteered to work for him or not. In Oliver Stone’s Nixon, there’s a great scene on the Key Bridge at night where Ed Harris’s Howard Hunt warns a very tremulous John Dean, played by David Hyde-Pierce. Nixon, Hunt tells Dean, “is the darkness reaching out for the darkness in everyone.” That was true, but this is what we know now: in this, Nixon was a rank amateur. From The New York Times:

Mr. Kelly said that he was stunned to see the criticism, which came from a Democratic congresswoman, Representative Frederica S. Wilson of Florida, after Mr. Trump delivered a similar message to the widow of one of the soldiers killed in Niger. Mr. Kelly said afterward that he had to collect his thoughts by going to Arlington National Cemetery for more than an hour. In a remarkable, somber appearance in the White House briefing room, Mr. Kelly, a retired Marine general whose son Second Lt. Robert Kelly was slain in battle in 2010, said he had told the president what he was told when he got the news.
“He was doing exactly what he wanted to do when he was killed,” Mr. Kelly recalled. “He knew what he was getting into by joining that one percent. He knew what the possibilities were, because we were at war.” “I was stunned when I came to work yesterday, and brokenhearted, when I saw what a member of Congress was doing,” he said. “What she was saying, what she was doing on TV. The only thing I could do to collect my thoughts was to go walk among the finest men or women on this earth."
That’s how he gets absolved. That’s how he always gets absolved. There’s always somebody willing to step up and push their soul to the middle of the table for him to gamble with and, when he loses, because he always loses at the game of being human, he reneges on the bet because that’s what he always does. Of all the “generals,” Kelly always was the one closest to being a true Trumpian; his tenure at Homeland Security overseeing ICE showed that Kelly at least was sympatico with the president*’s Id-driven hardball approach to immigration.And now, by deploying the memory of his son, he’s given his inexcusable boss that boss’s most recent alibi for that boss’s most recent offense against human decency and the dignity of his office. There’s a great sadness in that.
Sadder still is that it was all a pointless exercise. A few hours later, Donald Trump reached for his phone.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

What Fresh Hell? for October 19, 2017: Phone calls, supine Scout leaders, and a Marble who lost hers long since.



Shortly after taking office, Senator Thom Tillis complained that making food servers wash their hands in the restroom was government overreach.


Yesterday I wondered what could be more tasteless than MOTUS’ recasting of Antigone as a one-character show.


Senator Thom Tillis, of my own Tar Hell State, was quick to fill the lacuna:


A Republican senator says President Trump has shown more respect for U.S. troops during his first nine months in office than former President Barack Obama did in two terms.

Trump "has shown more respect for our troops in the first nine months then the prior president did in his eight years of office," Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) told reporters in the wake of Trump’s remarks on reaching out to families of fallen U.S. service members.

“The president shows a lot of respect for our troops, up to and including the practice that we’ve seen in certain professional teams to not respect the image of the flag that these men and women are fighting and dying for — so I think he’s done a good job," Tillis said.


Having leapt into the lead as the Senate’s moron, Tillis deserves his own acronym: SMOTUS.


And no, Senator Tillis is not a veteran. He is, however, dumb enough to have married and divorced the same woman twice. Slow learner, our Tom. The pace of the Senate helps him use that to seem “deliberative.”


*****


Cub Scout Ames Mayfield (right; Video screenshot courtesy of Lori Mayfield)




A Cub Scout in Broomfield has been kicked out of his den, allegedly for asking pointed questions of a Colorado state senator at meeting organized by the Boy Scouts.

Eleven-year-old Ames Mayfield, a fifth-grader at Prospect Ridge Academy and a Scout for five years, on Oct. 9 asked Sen. Vicki Marble, R-Fort Collins, questions about gun control, and about comments Marble made at a 2013 legislative hearing on poverty about mortality rates among African-Americans.

The boy’s mother, Lori Mayfield, on Wednesday said Ames was kicked out of his den, or Scout group, as a result.

“He is still kind of reeling from this,” Mayfield said. “He is really sensitive, my heart breaks for him.”

Ames’ questions, and other Scouts’ questions, were recorded and posted on YouTube by Mayfield in a video titled “Vicki Marble denies chicken-gate.”

“I was astonished that you blamed black people for poor health and poverty because of all the chicken and barbecue they eat,” Ames said to Marble at the Scout meeting.

“I didn’t, that was made up by the media,” Marble replied. “So, you want to believe it? You believe it. But that’s not how it went down. I didn’t do that. That was false. Get both sides of the story.”

In 2013 Marble said: “When you look at life expectancy, there are problems in the black race. Sickle-cell anemia is something that comes up. Diabetes is something that’s prevalent in the genetic makeup, and you just can’t help it.*

“Although I’ve got to say,” she continued at the time. “I’ve never had better barbecue and better chicken and ate better in my life than when you go down South and you, I mean, I love it. Everybody loves it.”

On Oct. 9, at the den presentation, Marble, speaking to the Scouts in calm, measured tones, responded, in part, to Ames’ question: “We have multicultural foods in the United States and we are very blessed to have it. And we all love it and we all eat it. And we just better figure out our genetics.”

Marble went on to tell the Scouts that she’s from a multi-ethnic background that includes “black, Mexican…Jew…Native American” and the “lousy Irish!” People in the audience chuckled.

“Decisions about who is in or out of a den are internal organizational matters that I won’t second guess,” Marble, majority caucus chair, said Wednesday night in an email to The Post. “I don’t blame the boy for asking the questions, since I believe there was an element of manipulation involved, and it wasn’t much different from the questions I normally field in other meetings. The invitation to meet with the scouts was never intended to cause friction and controversy.”

Prior to the den meeting, Ames researched Marble, his mother said, as the Scouts knew she would be speaking. Ames formulated the questions he would ask, she said.

“The only coaching I gave him was to be respectful,” Mayfield said. “Don’t be argumentative, preface things ‘with all due respect.'”

A den leader was upset by Ames’ line of questioning, Mayfield said. She is looking for a new den for Ames to join.

“I felt my son followed directions. He asked hard questions, but he was not disrespectful,” she said.


“The Denver Area Council is evaluating this matter closely and will treat all parties with dignity and respect,” said Nicole Cosme, marketing director of the Boy Scouts of America Denver Area Council.

Cosme added that the Boy Scouts is “a wholly nonpartisan organization and does not promote any one political position, candidate or philosophy.”

Other Scouts asked Marble about the border wall, fossil fuels, and voting for President Barack Obama. No other Scout was dismissed from the den, Mayfield said.


When not condescending to kids or drawing a public salary, Marble runs two bail bond shops and a liquor store.


*****




He largely succeeded. The question is whether MOTUS will, for once, STFU and let this pass, or start slinging poo again, given that the Chief of Staff chided the congresswoman who listened in on the call.


General Kelly, in sharp contrast to his nominal superior, uses words carefully. So it is interesting to see that he advised the *resident not to make calls, and that the *resident’s four calls to the Niger Green Beret casualties’ families were, in fact, the first he has made, contra his Rose Garden bleating:


When I took this job and talked to President Trump about how to do it, my first recommendation was he not do it because it’s not the phone call that parents, family members are looking forward to. It’s nice to do, in my opinion, in any event.

He asked me about previous Presidents, and I said, I can tell you that President Obama, who was my Commander-in-Chief when I was on active duty, did not call my family. That was not a criticism. That was just to simply say, I don’t believe President Obama called. That’s not a negative thing. I don’t believe President Bush called in all cases. I don’t believe any President, particularly when the casualty rates are very, very high — that Presidents call. But I believe they all write.

So when I gave that explanation to our President three days ago, he elected to make phone calls in the cases of four young men who we lost in Niger at the earlier part of this month. But then he said, how do you make these calls? If you’re not in the family, if you’ve never worn the uniform, if you’ve never been in combat, you can’t even imagine how to make that call.


Nor did General Kelly deny that the *resident uttered the tone-deaf condolences the *resident has denied:


So he called four people the other day and expressed his condolences in the best way that he could. And he said to me, what do I say? I said to him, sir, there’s nothing you can do to lighten the burden on these families.

Well, let me tell you what I told him. Let me tell you what my best friend, Joe Dunford, told me — because he was my casualty officer. He said, Kel, he was doing exactly what he wanted to do when he was killed. He knew what he was getting into by joining that 1 percent. He knew what the possibilities were because we’re at war. And when he died, in the four cases we’re talking about, Niger, and my son’s case in Afghanistan — when he died, he was surrounded by the best men on this Earth: his friends.

That’s what the President tried to say to four families the other day.


Had he stuck to what General Kelly told him, MOTUS would have done better. But he always knows better, and he lacks the grace to ever, ever admit he might have done anything better. He is, after all, a man who has never asked God to forgive him for a single thing in 71 depraved years:


"I am not sure I have. I just go on and try to do a better job from there. I don't think so," he said. "I think if I do something wrong, I think, I just try and make it right. I don't bring God into that picture. I don't.




*****




Charlie Pierce reviews the terms of the general’s contract with the devil:


This strikes me as a terribly sad moment. Everything and everybody this president* touches goes bad from the inside out. And it doesn’t matter to me whether people volunteered to work for him or not. In Oliver Stone’s Nixon, there’s a great scene on the Key Bridge at night where Ed Harris’s Howard Hunt warns a very tremulous John Dean, played by David Hyde-Pierce. Nixon, Hunt tells Dean, “is the darkness reaching out for the darkness in everyone.” That was true, but this is what we know now: in this, Nixon was a rank amateur. From The New York Times:

Mr. Kelly said that he was stunned to see the criticism, which came from a Democratic congresswoman, Representative Frederica S. Wilson of Florida, after Mr. Trump delivered a similar message to the widow of one of the soldiers killed in Niger. Mr. Kelly said afterward that he had to collect his thoughts by going to Arlington National Cemetery for more than an hour. In a remarkable, somber appearance in the White House briefing room, Mr. Kelly, a retired Marine general whose son Second Lt. Robert Kelly was slain in battle in 2010, said he had told the president what he was told when he got the news.

“He was doing exactly what he wanted to do when he was killed,” Mr. Kelly recalled. “He knew what he was getting into by joining that one percent. He knew what the possibilities were, because we were at war.” “I was stunned when I came to work yesterday, and brokenhearted, when I saw what a member of Congress was doing,” he said. “What she was saying, what she was doing on TV. The only thing I could do to collect my thoughts was to go walk among the finest men or women on this earth.”

That’s how he gets absolved. That’s how he always gets absolved. There’s always somebody willing to step up and push their soul to the middle of the table for him to gamble with and, when he loses, because he always loses at the game of being human, he reneges on the bet because that’s what he always does. Of all the “generals,” Kelly always was the one closest to being a true Trumpian; his tenure at Homeland Security overseeing ICE showed that Kelly at least was sympatico with the president*’s Id-driven hardbar approach to immigration.

And now, by deploying the memory of his son, he’s given his inexcusable boss that boss’s most recent alibi for that boss’s most recent offense against human decency and the dignity of his office. There’s a great sadness in that.


*****


#AltFacts Headline of the Day, from #AltRight Breitbart News:


Screenshot 2017-10-19 at 18.16.55 - Edited.png


President Bush 2 is, in fact, the third of his family to hold high office. His father was a congressman, representative to China, UN ambassador, CIA director, vice president, and president. His grandfather, Prescott Bush, was a senator from Connecticut in the 1950s.


*****


The mass conversion of American Christianists to transactional religious standards is but part of a larger trend. Pew Research reports,




As Time reported last year, evangelicals got the vision first:


In 2011 and again just ahead of the election, PRRI asked Americans whether a political leader who committed an immoral act in his or her private life could nonetheless behave ethically and fulfill their duties in their public life. Back in 2011, consistent with the “values voter” brand’s insistence on the importance of personal character, only 30% of white evangelical Protestants agreed with this statement. But this year, 72% of white evangelicals now say they believe a candidate can build a kind of moral wall between his private and public life. In a shocking reversal, white evangelicals have gone from being the least likely to the most likely group to agree that a candidate’s personal immorality has no bearing on his performance in public office. Today, in fact, they are more likely than Americans who claim no religious affiliation at all to say such a moral bifurcation is possible.


_____________


*Wikipedia adds,

The Denver Post editorial board described Marble's comments as, "... finger-lickin' stupid."[10]

In comments to the press, Ryan Call, former chairman of the Colorado Republican Party distanced the party from Marble's comments. "Sen. Marble's careless comments do not reflect the views of Republicans," he said.  A prominent pro-Republican and conservative political blog, Colorado Peak Politics, said, "Marble is the latest legislator to join what might be kindly dubbed the "legislative moron caucus" after an ignorant and offensive soliloquy about race and diet."

In an interview with the Fort Collins Coloradoan, Marble remained "unapologetic."