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Thursday, May 19, 2016

Here's a reminder why, if you want to know what's going on in America's courts, you need to read SCOTUSblog

Thursday round-up

Yesterday’s coverage of the Court was dominated by the announcement, by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, of a list of potential Supreme Court nominees.  Coverage comes from NPR’s Nina Totenberg, Jenna Johnson and Robert Barnes of The Washington Post, and Alan Rappeport and Charlie Savage of The New York Times.  Commentary comes from Dara Lind and Dylan Matthews at Vox, Kent Scheidegger at Crime and Consequences, and Ilya Shapiro at Cato at Liberty.
 There was still more coverage relating to the nomination of Chief Judge Merrick Garland to succeed the late Justice Antonin Scalia.  First, as Dave Boyer of The Washington Times reports, “Senate Democrats held a mock confirmation hearing Wednesday” for Garland.  And at Empirical SCOTUS, Adam Feldman describes the database that he created of Garland’s opinions.
More commentary on Monday’s ruling in Zubik v. Burwell, the challenge to the Obama administration’s birth-control mandate and the accommodation offered to religious non-profits, comes from Michael McConnell at The Volokh Conspiracy, Leland Beck at Federal Regulations Advisor, and Steven Mazie in The Economist.
Commentary on Monday’s decision in Spokeo v. Robins, in which the Court sent a Virginia man’s lawsuit against the search engine Spokeo back to the Ninth Circuit, comes from David Gans at Casetext and Andrew Pincus at Mayer Brown’s Class Defense Blog.
And at the Knowledge Center, Lisa Soronen weighs in on Monday’s decision in Merrill Lynch v. Manning, describing it as “a victory for state courts” but adding that it is “just complicated to explain how.”
In The Huffington Post, I. Beverly Lake, Jr., urges the Court to grant review in the case of a Louisiana death-row inmate whose petition for review is slated for review at today’s Conference; Ronald Sullivan does the same at ACSblog.
Briefly:
  • A team at Vox outlines the Court’s seven most important decisions of the Term.

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